[Friday Wrap Up]: 28

This week: a lovely photo essay and video telling stories about abortion experiences, a reframing of abortion beyond “women’s rights,” questioning the (dreaded) pelvic exam, a new continuing ed opportunity from Evidence Based Birth, revolutionary NICU care, and more on full spectrum doulas from a new blogger!

Abortion: After the Decision

Love this photo essay:

I was surprised when I started talking openly with my friends and colleagues about abortion how many of them had had one themselves. I hadn’t known that 40 percent of American women will have an abortion during their lifetimes. While it’s a personal and private experience, there are 45 million women in America who share in it, and it shouldn’t be a shameful secret. The silence creates a stigma that prevents a meaningful discussion and understanding in the national debate and dialogue.

Not Everyone Who Has an Abortion is a Woman: How to Frame the Abortion Rights Issue

I missed this when it first came out, but was happy to come across it recently. There’s a lot of good stuff here that directly speaks to the kind of inclusive environment of care I hope to create as a nurse-midwife.

We must acknowledge and come to terms with the implicit cissexism in assuming that only women have abortions. Trans men have abortions. People who do not identify as women have abortions. They deserve to be represented in our advocacy and activist framework. Honestly, I am guilty of perpetuating that harmful myth, both in my rhetoric and framing. I often frame abortion restrictions as misogynistic attacks meant to control women’s reproductive lives, and that is true. But abortion restrictions also affect the lives of people who aren’t women, and they hinder trans men and gender-non-conforming people and others who were Designated Female at Birth (DFAB) from accessing abortion care, as well.

Questioning the Pelvic Exam

I know I’m not alone in wondering what the heck the point of this annual exam is…in fact, I was thrilled last year to read Feminist Midwife’s questions about it, too. This week, the NYT’s Jane Brody writes about a growing number of gynecologists who are starting to question the purpose of this exam.

These experts say that for women who are well, a routine bimanual exam is not supported by medical evidence, increases the costs of medical care and discourages some women, especially adolescents, from seeking needed care.

Moreover, the exam sometimes reveals benign conditions that lead to follow-up procedures, including surgery, that do not improve a woman’s health but instead cause anxiety, lost time from work, potential complications and unnecessary costs.

And even more stunning, yet not surprising:

How important is this exam to a doctor’s income? Slightly more than half of those surveyed ranked “ensuring adequate compensation” as very important or moderately important.

One of the most vexing problems in medicine today is the fact that doctors get paid only for performing procedures, not for the time they spend talking with patients to discuss issues of possible medical importance.

Giving Birth Based on Best Evidence

Rebecca Dekker, PhD, RN, APRN, over at Evidence Based Birth, is starting an online continuing Ed series, beginning with a class on “Big Babies.” Be sure to check the giveaway!!

NICU program that gives parents charge of baby’s care cuts stress

This is an awesome, awesome new movement in NICU care: giving parents more responsibility in the care of their newborns.

“With family integrated care, we have done something quite different,” explains Dr. Shoo Lee, pediatrician-in-chief and director of the Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre.

“What we’ve done is to say that for all babies in the NICU, the parents should be the primary caregivers, not the nurses. And the nurses are really teachers to the parents.”

The program was instituted following a 2011-2012 pilot project in which the parents of 40 newborns were asked to spend a minimum of eight hours a day in the NICU and tasked with the overall management of their child’s care.

That included bathing and changing diapers, monitoring the infant’s vital signs, and recording feedings and weight gain on their medical chart. Nurses were responsible for the medical side of care — looking after feeding tubes, adjusting ventilation apparatus and administering medications.

The babies’ progress was compared with those whose care was primarily provided by nurses, and Lee says “the results were phenomenal.”

Full Spectrum Doulaa new blog!

A friend and fellow doula has started this awesome blog about full spectrum doula work…here’s an excerpt from her first post, The Politics of Pain, Part 1

I am very much in favor of a movement that reclaims abortion as a complex matter of the heart, just like birth. Birth and Abortion are the yin and yang of reproductive power. I know that abortion will never be a happy event in the way that birth usually is… but I know it is a powerful experience and I think even in our most “pro-choice” enclaves, we are still blowing it. We are often working to hard to “rescue” people from their circumstances, thereby failing to embrace the growth and change that come with going through something.